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The Limited Promise of Geographical Indications for Developing Country Farmers

Geographical Indications at the Crossroads of Trade, Development, and Culture in the Asia-Pacific (Irene Calboli and Wee Loon Ng-Loy, Eds., Cambridge University Press, 2016)

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2016-24

32 Pages Posted: 3 Oct 2016  

Justin Hughes

Loyola Law School Los Angeles

Date Written: October 1, 2016

Abstract

This book chapter attempts to cut through the hype from advocates of strong protection of “geographical indications” (GIs) and appreciate GIs for what are: a potentially useful tool – in some circumstances – for raising rural incomes in developing countries. In this sense, properly calibrated legal protection of GIs should be part of a “development agenda” for jurisdictions with significant rural economies. The chapter explores some of the factors determining whether and how GI marketing (and GI legal protection) can help any particular rural region – with specific discussions of Ethiopia’s coffee regions, Femi liquor from Goa, and Papus New Guinea coffee.

Keywords: Geographical Indications, Rural Development, Intellectual Property, Coffee, Trademarks

Suggested Citation

Hughes, Justin, The Limited Promise of Geographical Indications for Developing Country Farmers (October 1, 2016). Geographical Indications at the Crossroads of Trade, Development, and Culture in the Asia-Pacific (Irene Calboli and Wee Loon Ng-Loy, Eds., Cambridge University Press, 2016); Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2016-24. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2846520

Justin Hughes (Contact Author)

Loyola Law School Los Angeles ( email )

919 Albany Street
Los Angeles, CA 90015-1211
United States
213-736-8108 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.justinhughes.net

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