Nominal Loss Aversion, Housing Equity Constraints, and Household Mobility: Evidence from the United States

Center for Policy Research, Working Paper No. 42

53 Pages Posted: 30 Sep 2001  

Gary V. Engelhardt

Syracuse University - Center for Policy Research; Dartmouth College - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: August 27, 2001

Abstract

This paper exploits the significant recent variation in U.S. house prices to empirically examine the effect on housing equity constraints and nominal loss aversion on household mobility. The analysis uses unique, detailed data from 1985-1996 on household characteristics, mobility, and wealth from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) matched with house price data from 149 metropolitan areas to estimate semi-parametric proportional hazard models of intra- and inter-metropolitan mobility. There are five principal findings. First, household intra-metropolitan own-to-own mobility responds differently to nominal housing losses than to gains. Second, nominal loss aversion is significantly less pronounced in intra-metropolitan own-to-rent and inter-metropolitan mobility, respectively. Third, there is some evidence of binding equity constraints in intra-metropolitan own-to-own mobility. Fourth, there is little evidence that low equity constrains intra-metropolitan own-to-rent and inter-metropolitan mobility, respectively. Fifth, a comparison of the estimated effects indicates that nominal loss aversion has a more dominant effect than equity constraints in restricting household mobility: roughly two-and-a-half to three times the impact of equity constraints.

JEL Classification: H31

Suggested Citation

Engelhardt, Gary V., Nominal Loss Aversion, Housing Equity Constraints, and Household Mobility: Evidence from the United States (August 27, 2001). Center for Policy Research, Working Paper No. 42. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=285170 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.285170

Gary V. Engelhardt (Contact Author)

Syracuse University - Center for Policy Research ( email )

426 Eggers Hall
Syracuse, NY 13244
United States
315-443-4598 (Phone)
315-443-1081 (Fax)

Dartmouth College - Department of Economics ( email )

Hanover, NH 03755
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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