The Effects of 9/11 on Attitudes Toward Immigration and the Moderating Role of Education

29 Pages Posted: 28 Oct 2016

See all articles by Simone Schüller

Simone Schüller

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute) - Ifo Institute; Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA); FBK-IRVAPP

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Date Written: November 2016

Abstract

The 9/11 terror attacks are likely to have induced an increase in anti‐immigrant and anti‐foreigner sentiments, not only among US residents but also beyond US borders. Using unique longitudinal data from the German Socio‐Economic Panel and exploiting exogenous variation in interview timing throughout 2001, I find that the 9/11 events caused an immediate shift of around 40 percent of one within‐standard deviation to more negative attitudes toward immigration and resulted in a considerable decrease in concerns over xenophobic hostility among the German population. The quasi‐experiment 9/11 provides evidence on the relevance of non‐economic factors in attitude formation and the role of education in moderating the negative terrorism shock. Additional descriptive analysis suggests that the effects have also been persistent in the years after the attacks.

Suggested Citation

Schüller, Simone, The Effects of 9/11 on Attitudes Toward Immigration and the Moderating Role of Education (November 2016). Kyklos, Vol. 69, Issue 4, pp. 604-632, 2016, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2859173 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/kykl.12122

Simone Schüller (Contact Author)

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