Social Assessment of Inhabited Islands for Wildlife Management and Eradication

18 Pages Posted: 21 Aug 2017

See all articles by James Russell

James Russell

University of Auckland

C.(Nick) Taylor

Taylor Baines & Associates

Jo Aley

University of Auckland

Date Written: April 30, 2016

Abstract

Eradication of introduced predators from inhabited islands requires consideration of both technical and social feasibility. Historically, biologists have struggled to successfully engage in the social components of eradication planning. Island communities have unique features which require consideration in eradication planning. Social impact assessment is a powerful planning tool used widely outside of wildlife management. We outline the core components of a social impact assessment as it could be applied to eradication planning on inhabited islands. We summarise previous experience in social assessment and community engagement for introduced predator eradication on inhabited islands, and as an example develop a social profile for inhabited islands of the Hauraki Gulf of New Zealand. We conclude that social impact assessment has great potential to improve eradication feasibility assessment, and should be routinely applied in eradication scoping on inhabited islands.

Suggested Citation

Russell, James and Taylor, Charles Nicholas and Aley, Joanne, Social Assessment of Inhabited Islands for Wildlife Management and Eradication (April 30, 2016). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2873280 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2873280

James Russell (Contact Author)

University of Auckland ( email )

Private Bag 92019
Auckland Mail Centre
Auckland, 1142
New Zealand

Charles Nicholas Taylor

Taylor Baines & Associates ( email )

PO Box 329
Rangiora
Christchurch, 7400
New Zealand

Joanne Aley

University of Auckland ( email )

Private Bag 92019
Auckland Mail Centre
Auckland, 1142
New Zealand

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