New Governance and the 'New Paradigm' of Police Accountability: A Democratic Approach to Police Reform

54 Pages Posted: 22 Nov 2016

See all articles by Kami Chavis

Kami Chavis

Wake Forest University Law School

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: 2010

Abstract

Despite accusations of racial profiling, only Sergeant James Crowley knows what subjective motivations prompted him to arrest Harvard Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr., for disorderly conduct at his home in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on July 16, 2009. While reasonable people may disagree about whether Officer Crowley engaged in racial profiling when arresting Gates, it is undeniable that Gates's arrest exposed a long-standing rift between some communities and the police officers who serve them. Following the incident, the divisions that have long existed in the United States between police and citizens became clear.

The historical rift between police officers and the citizens they serve has often caused communities to erupt in protests. This Article proposes that policymakers should draw from the emerging New Governance theoretical framework particularly democratic experimentalism-in order to develop strategies to successfully reform law enforcement agencies.

Keywords: Police Misconduct, Police Reform, Community-Policing

Suggested Citation

Chavis, Kami, New Governance and the 'New Paradigm' of Police Accountability: A Democratic Approach to Police Reform (2010). Catholic University Law Review, Vol. 59, 2010, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2873820

Kami Chavis (Contact Author)

Wake Forest University Law School ( email )

P.O. Box 7206
Winston-Salem, NC 27109
United States

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