An International Bill of Rights for Women? - Why the United States Refuses to Ratify the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women

4 Pages Posted: 28 Nov 2016

Date Written: March 21, 2005

Abstract

The Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) is an international treaty that provides universal standards for protecting and promoting women’s rights; it was adopted by the United Nations in 1979 and ratified by 170 countries. The United States, however, remains one of the only countries that have not signed the treaty. The purpose of this paper is to spark concern over this, and to emphasize the fact that supposed negative consequences of ratification are far outweighed by the benefits it will bring to women worldwide; and the time is ripe for such action. Caution on behalf of the United States in this day-and-age is shameful and foolish. Most significantly, failure by the United States to take action now is detrimental to its standing as an international authority on human rights.

Keywords: human rights, united nations, women, women rights, discrimination, women, feminism, feminist

Suggested Citation

Borup, Jeffrey, An International Bill of Rights for Women? - Why the United States Refuses to Ratify the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (March 21, 2005). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2875830 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2875830

Jeffrey Borup (Contact Author)

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