The Uses of Religious Identity, Practice, and Dogma in 'Soft' and 'Hard' Counterterrorism

Security and Human Rights, (Liora Lazarus & Benjamin Goold, eds. Hart Pub. 2017, Forthcoming

U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 609

18 Pages Posted: 1 Dec 2016 Last revised: 17 Feb 2017

See all articles by Aziz Z. Huq

Aziz Z. Huq

University of Chicago - Law School

Date Written: November 29, 2016

Abstract

This book chapter maps the complex intersection between concepts of Islam and the Muslim and counterterrorism law and policy. My central claim is that faith is no longer weaponized only by violent terrorist groups. States too have realized that Islam can be deployed under a security banner in a variety of ideological and practical ways. At the same time, a fractious wave of right-of-center populism has crashed over northern Europe and the United States with demands for newly restrictive rules targeting Muslims migrants and citizens. As a result of these colliding technocratic and populist dynamics, Islamic identity and practice now play three distinct roles in counterterrorism law and policy — as proxy for risk, object for reform, and object of extirpation. The result of these trends is likely to be a sharp rise in formal and informal contestation over the nature and legitimacy of Islam as a religious identity.

Keywords: National Security, Islam

Suggested Citation

Huq, Aziz Z., The Uses of Religious Identity, Practice, and Dogma in 'Soft' and 'Hard' Counterterrorism (November 29, 2016). Security and Human Rights, (Liora Lazarus & Benjamin Goold, eds. Hart Pub. 2017, Forthcoming; U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 609. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2877251 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2877251

Aziz Z. Huq (Contact Author)

University of Chicago - Law School ( email )

1111 E. 60th St.
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

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