When the Money Runs Out: Do Cash Transfers Have Sustained Effects on Human Capital Accumulation?

95 Pages Posted: 2 Dec 2016

See all articles by Sarah Baird

Sarah Baird

George Washington University - School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS)

Craig McIntosh

University of California, San Diego (UCSD) - Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies (IRPS)

Berk Ozler

World Bank - Development Economics Research Group (DECRG)

Date Written: December 1, 2016

Abstract

This study examines the medium-term effects of a two-year cash transfer program targeted to adolescent girls and young women. Significant declines in HIV prevalence, teen pregnancy, and early marriage among recipients of unconditional cash transfers (UCTs) during the program evaporated quickly two years after the cessation of transfers. However, children born to UCT beneficiaries during the program had significantly higher height-for-age z-scores at follow-up. On the other hand, conditional cash transfers (CCTs) offered to out-of-school females at baseline produced a large increase in educational attainment and a sustained reduction in the total number of births, but caused no gains in health, labor market outcomes, or empowerment. The findings point to both the promise and the limitations of cash transfer programs for sustained gains in welfare among young women.

Keywords: Social Protections & Assistance, Educational Sciences

Suggested Citation

Baird, Sarah and McIntosh, Craig and Ozler, Berk, When the Money Runs Out: Do Cash Transfers Have Sustained Effects on Human Capital Accumulation? (December 1, 2016). World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 7901. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2879193

Sarah Baird

George Washington University - School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS) ( email )

2300 I Street, NW
Ross Hall 106
Washington, DC 20037
United States

Craig McIntosh

University of California, San Diego (UCSD) - Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies (IRPS) ( email )

9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093-0519
United States

Berk Ozler (Contact Author)

World Bank - Development Economics Research Group (DECRG) ( email )

1818 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20433
United States

HOME PAGE: http://econ.worldbank.org/staff/bozler

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