Early, Late or Never? When Does Parental Education Impact Child Outcomes?

48 Pages Posted: 8 Dec 2016

See all articles by Matthew Dickson

Matthew Dickson

University of Bristol - Leverhulme Centre for Market and Public Organisation (CMPO)

Paul Gregg

University of Bath - Department of Social and Policy Sciences

Harriet Robinson

University of Bristol - Leverhulme Centre for Market and Public Organisation (CMPO)

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Date Written: October 2016

Abstract

We estimate the causal effect of parents' education on their children's education and examine the timing of the impact. We identify the causal effect by exploiting the exogenous shift in (parents') education levels induced by the 1972 minimum school leaving age reform in England. Increasing parental education has a positive causal effect on children's outcomes that is evident in preschool assessments at age 4 and continues to be visible up to and including high‐stakes examinations taken at age 16. Children of parents affected by the reform attain results around 0.1 standard deviations higher than those whose parents were not impacted.

Suggested Citation

Dickson, Matthew and Gregg, Paul and Robinson, Harriet, Early, Late or Never? When Does Parental Education Impact Child Outcomes? (October 2016). Feature Issue, Vol. 126, Issue 596, pp. F184-F231, 2016. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2882227 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ecoj.12356

Matthew Dickson (Contact Author)

University of Bristol - Leverhulme Centre for Market and Public Organisation (CMPO) ( email )

12 Priory Road
Bristol BS8 1TN
United Kingdom

Paul Gregg

University of Bath - Department of Social and Policy Sciences ( email )

Claverton Down
Bath, BA7 2AY
United Kingdom

Harriet Robinson

University of Bristol - Leverhulme Centre for Market and Public Organisation (CMPO) ( email )

12 Priory Road
Bristol BS8 1TN
United Kingdom

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