Evaluating Competing Theories of Informal Employment: Some Lessons from a 28-Nation European Survey

International Journal of Business and Globalisation, Vol. 15, No.1, pp. 45-62, 2015

36 Pages Posted: 13 Dec 2016 Last revised: 11 Jan 2017

See all articles by Colin Williams

Colin Williams

University of Sheffield - School of Management

Jan E. Windebank

University of Sheffield - Department of French

Date Written: 2015

Abstract

Informal employment has been variously explained as resulting from: economic under-development and a lack of modernisation (modernisation theory); high taxes and state interference in the free market (neo-liberal theory) or inadequate levels of state intervention to protect citizens (political economy theory). The aim of this paper is to evaluate these competing theories by comparing the findings of a 2013 survey on the variations in the prevalence of informal employment across 28 nations with cross-national variations in the economic and social characteristics each theory denotes as determinants. The finding is that informal employment is less prevalent in wealthier, modernised societies with higher levels of taxation and social protection expenditure, more effective social transfer systems and lower levels of severe material deprivation. No evidence is thus found to support neo-liberal theory, but evidence is found to support the modernisation and political economy theories. The paper concludes by discussing the theoretical and policy implications.

Keywords: Undeclared Work, Shadow Economy, Informal Economy, Tax Evasion, Tax Policy, Labour Law, Labour Economics, European Union

JEL Classification: H26, J46, J48, K34, K42, O17, P37

Suggested Citation

Williams, Colin and Windebank, Jan E., Evaluating Competing Theories of Informal Employment: Some Lessons from a 28-Nation European Survey (2015). International Journal of Business and Globalisation, Vol. 15, No.1, pp. 45-62, 2015, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2883480

Colin Williams (Contact Author)

University of Sheffield - School of Management ( email )

15 Conduit Road
Sheffield, S10 1FL
United Kingdom

HOME PAGE: http://https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/management/staff/williams/index

Jan E. Windebank

University of Sheffield - Department of French ( email )

United Kingdom
(0114) 222 4888 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.shef.ac.uk/french/staff/jwindebank.html

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