How Moral Perceptions Influence Intergroup Tolerance: Evidence from Lebanon, Morocco and the United States

Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Forthcoming

36 Pages Posted: 13 Dec 2016  

Nadine Obeid

New School for Social Research

Nichole Argo

Carnegie Mellon University

Jeremy Ginges

The New School for Social Research

Date Written: December 11, 2016

Abstract

Intergroup boundaries are often associated with differences in moral codes. How does the perception of similarity and dissimilarity in moral worldviews influence tolerant relationships between members of different groups? We theorized that the relationship between perceived moral similarity and intergroup tolerance is domain specific. Specifically, we proposed that because people treat autonomy values (e.g., caring for others, being fair) as denoting universal rights and obligations, but binding values (e.g., purity) as denoting rights and obligations that apply preferentially for their own group, perceived similarity on autonomy values should be more relevant than perceived similarity on binding values to intergroup tolerance. Here we describe correlational and experimental evidence to support this prediction from studies carried out in Lebanon (with sectarian groups), in Morocco (with ethnic groups), and in the United States (with ideological groups). Implications for understanding intergroup relations and theories of morality are discussed.

Keywords: Morality, Intergroup Tolerance, Perspective Taking, Political Psychology, Religion

Suggested Citation

Obeid, Nadine and Argo, Nichole and Ginges, Jeremy, How Moral Perceptions Influence Intergroup Tolerance: Evidence from Lebanon, Morocco and the United States (December 11, 2016). Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Forthcoming . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2883831

Nadine Obeid

New School for Social Research ( email )

6 East 16th Street
New York, NY 10003
United States

Nichole Argo

Carnegie Mellon University ( email )

Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890
United States

Jeremy Ginges (Contact Author)

The New School for Social Research ( email )

6 East 16th Street
New York, NY 10003
United States

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