Obscene Supplements, or, What We Write About When We Write About Death

PostModern Productions, 2001

7 Pages Posted: 17 Dec 2016

See all articles by Mary Anne Franks

Mary Anne Franks

University of Miami School of Law

Date Written: July 14, 2001

Abstract

How do we speak of death? How do we speak of women's death? All speech, writes Derrida, requires a supplement; all speech is no more than supplement. But women's death, in refugee camps, in wars, in homes, is so often uniquely, obscenely supplemented with rape and mutilation. Women may die as "people," even as "humans." As a mass grave, a release of smoke, a tangle of bones, as the compound womenandchildren. Women may not die, singularly, as women, without being supplemented. Ingeborg Bachmann's novel Malina offers a fantastical reprieve: its narrator speaks the murder of a woman, a murder that belongs to no one, to which no one belongs, that answers for itself, that answers no one.

Keywords: Ingeborg Bachmann, Malina, Derrida, Rousseau, Emile, rape, differance, Of Grammatology

Suggested Citation

Franks, Mary Anne, Obscene Supplements, or, What We Write About When We Write About Death (July 14, 2001). PostModern Productions, 2001. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2886677

Mary Anne Franks (Contact Author)

University of Miami School of Law ( email )

P.O. Box 248087
Coral Gables, FL 33146
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.law.miami.edu/faculty/mary-anne-franks

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
11
Abstract Views
146
PlumX Metrics