Can't We Be Your Neighbor? Trayvon Martin, George Zimmerman, and the Resistance to Blacks as Neighbors

22 Pages Posted: 22 Dec 2016

See all articles by Jeannine Bell

Jeannine Bell

Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Date Written: 2015

Abstract

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 paved the way for the Fair Housing Act of 1968, which was designed to address discrimination in one of our most intimate space — neighborhoods. Fifty-six years after the passage of the Fair Housing Act, Americans remain fiercely resistant to the concept of neighborhood integration. This Article uses an unlikely event, the killing of Trayvon Martin, to discuss one manifestation of that resistance with disturbing implications.

Keywords: hate crime, housing integration, segregation, race relations, violence, crime, race, racism

Suggested Citation

Bell, Jeannine, Can't We Be Your Neighbor? Trayvon Martin, George Zimmerman, and the Resistance to Blacks as Neighbors (2015). Boston University Law Review, Vol. 95, 2015; Indiana Legal Studies Research Paper No. 352. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2888975

Jeannine Bell (Contact Author)

Indiana University Maurer School of Law ( email )

211 S. Indiana Avenue
Bloomington, IN 47405
United States
812-856-5013 (Phone)
812-855-0555 (Fax)

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