Who Benefits Most from Snap? A Study of Food Security and Food Spending

35 Pages Posted: 27 Dec 2016 Last revised: 17 Jan 2017

See all articles by Partha Deb

Partha Deb

City University of New York, CUNY Hunter College - Department of Economics

Christian Gregory

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) - Economic Research Service (ERS)

Date Written: December 2016

Abstract

We study the effects of SNAP participation on food insecurity and food spending using finite mixture models that allow for a priori unspecified heterogeneous effects. We identify a low food security subgroup comprising a third of the population for whom SNAP participation increases the probability of high food security by 20-30 percentage points. There is no affect of SNAP on the remaining two-thirds of the population. SNAP increases food spending in the previous week by $50-$65 for a low modal spending subgroup comprising two-thirds of the population, with no effect for the remaining third of the population.

Suggested Citation

Deb, Partha and Gregory, Christian, Who Benefits Most from Snap? A Study of Food Security and Food Spending (December 2016). NBER Working Paper No. w22977. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2890081

Partha Deb (Contact Author)

City University of New York, CUNY Hunter College - Department of Economics ( email )

695 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10021
United States

Christian Gregory

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) - Economic Research Service (ERS) ( email )

1800 M Street NW
Washington, DC 20036-5831
United States

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