Does Private Schooling Improve International Test Scores? Evidence from a Natural Experiment

25 Pages Posted: 23 Jan 2017 Last revised: 2 Oct 2017

See all articles by Corey DeAngelis

Corey DeAngelis

Cato Institute - Center for Educational Freedom

Date Written: October 1, 2017

Abstract

I estimate the effect of private schooling on Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) scores of 62 countries across the globe from 2000 to 2012. I employ time and country-fixed effects regression models and also use the short-run demand for schooling within a country and year as an instrument for private share of schooling enrollment. I find evidence to suggest that increased private schooling leads to improved PISA scores around the world. Specifically, the model using control variables alongside country and year fixed effects finds that a one percentage point increase in the private share of schooling enrollment is associated with a 1.6-point increase in math scores and a 1.2-point increase in reading scores. However, only one of the two relationships remains statistically significant in the instrumental variables analysis.

Keywords: private school; school choice; PISA; international education

JEL Classification: I28

Suggested Citation

DeAngelis, Corey, Does Private Schooling Improve International Test Scores? Evidence from a Natural Experiment (October 1, 2017). EDRE Working Paper No. 2017-02. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2903523 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2903523

Corey DeAngelis (Contact Author)

Cato Institute - Center for Educational Freedom ( email )

1000 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20001-5403
United States

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