Moving Towards Estimating Sons' Lifetime Intergenerational Economic Mobility in the UK

22 Pages Posted: 29 Jan 2017

See all articles by Paul Gregg

Paul Gregg

University of Bath - Department of Social and Policy Sciences

Lindsey Macmillan

University of Bristol

Claudia Vittori

University of Rome La Sapienza

Date Written: February 2017

Abstract

Estimates of intergenerational economic mobility that use point in time measures of income and earnings suffer from lifecycle and attenuation bias. They also suffer from sample selection issues and further bias driven by spells out of work. We consider these issues together for UK data, the National Child Development Study and British Cohort Study, for the first time. When all three biases are considered, our best estimate of lifetime intergenerational economic persistence in the UK is 0.43 for children born in 1970. Whilst we argue that this is the best available estimate to date, we discuss why there is good reason to believe that this is still a lower bound, owing to residual attenuation bias.

Suggested Citation

Gregg, Paul and Macmillan, Lindsey and Vittori, Claudia, Moving Towards Estimating Sons' Lifetime Intergenerational Economic Mobility in the UK (February 2017). Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Vol. 79, Issue 1, pp. 79-100, 2017. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2907173 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/obes.12146

Paul Gregg (Contact Author)

University of Bath - Department of Social and Policy Sciences ( email )

Claverton Down
Bath, BA7 2AY
United Kingdom

Lindsey Macmillan

University of Bristol ( email )

University of Bristol,
Senate House, Tyndall Avenue
Bristol, BS8 ITH
United Kingdom

HOME PAGE: http://www.bris.ac.uk/depts/CMPO/people/biomacmillan.htm

Claudia Vittori

University of Rome La Sapienza ( email )

Via del Castro Laurenziano
Roma, Rome 00161
Italy

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