Andrea Yates: A Continuing Story About Insanity

The Insanity Defense: Multidisciplinary Views on Its History, Trends, and Controversies 367- 416 (Mark D. White, ed. 2017) (Cal.: Praeger)

Fordham Law Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2909041

53 Pages Posted: 2 Feb 2017  

Deborah W. Denno

Fordham University School of Law

Date Written: January 1, 2017

Abstract

In 2001, Andrea Yates did the unthinkable: she drowned her five children one by one in a bathtub within the course of minutes. She immediately confessed and explained that she killed them because she under the influence of Satan did not want them to be “tortured by Satan” as she was. Despite the defense uncovering evidence of Yates’ history of postpartum depression and psychosis, the jury did not accept her insanity defense and convicted her of capital murder with a sentence of life in prison. Influential in this decision was the testimony of prosecution expert Dr. Park Dietz, who pushed the view that Yates had rationally planned the murders. Dietz’s testimony was troubling, not only because there was little, if any, empirical basis for his conclusions, but because the defense discovered that he had introduced false testimony during the trial. During cross-examination, Dietz explained that he was a consultant for Law & Order and that one episode aired prior to Yates’ crime involving a woman with postpartum depression who drowned her children in a bathtub and was found insane. Yet the defense discovered no such show existed. Even though a grand jury found Dietz innocent of perjury, the defense appealed Yates’ sentence. Given the degree of Dietz’s impact on the jury, the Texas Court of Appeals reversed the judgment and remanded the case. In this second trial in 2006, Yates was no longer eligible for the death penalty and much more information had been uncovered regarding Yates’ mental condition. The jury unanimously found Yates not guilty by reason of insanity. While the Yates case helped to inform the world of the pervasiveness of postpartum depression and psychosis, no substantive changes have been made in Texas insanity law. This chapter explains how the state’s definition of insanity influenced the first trial and both constrained and confused how the jury could view Yates’ actions.

Keywords: post partum psychosis, insanity, death penalty, criminal law, punishment

Suggested Citation

Denno, Deborah W., Andrea Yates: A Continuing Story About Insanity (January 1, 2017). The Insanity Defense: Multidisciplinary Views on Its History, Trends, and Controversies 367- 416 (Mark D. White, ed. 2017) (Cal.: Praeger); Fordham Law Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2909041. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2909041

Deborah W. Denno (Contact Author)

Fordham University School of Law ( email )

Fordham University School of Law
150 West 62nd Street
New York, NY 10023
United States
212-636-6868 (Phone)
212-636-6899 (Fax)

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