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The Paradox of Inclusion: Social Citizenship and Active Labor Market Policies

65 Pages Posted: 25 Nov 2001  

Joel F. Handler

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - School of Law

Date Written: November 13, 2001

Abstract

This paper deals with "welfare" in the U.S., the program primarily for poor single mothers and their families, and "workfare" in Western Europe, the "active labor market" policies that deal primarily with the long-term unemployed, lone parents, the unemployed youth, immigrants, and other vulnerable groups, usually lumped together as the "socially excluded." I explore the ideologies that have led to these changes comparing different views of social citizenship. The Western Europeans argue that their changes, although they resemble the American changes in some respects, are fundamentally different both in ideology and in practice. I raise questions about those claims. As others have pointed out, the move towards "workfare" in Western Europe represents a fundamental change in both the meaning of social citizenship and the administration of welfare. The active move to include the socially excluded inevitably involves selectivity. These programs make significant new demands on field-level administration. The paper concludes with suggestions for accountability and protection.

Suggested Citation

Handler, Joel F., The Paradox of Inclusion: Social Citizenship and Active Labor Market Policies (November 13, 2001). UCLA, Public Law Research Paper No. 01-20. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=290927 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.290927

Joel F. Handler (Contact Author)

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - School of Law ( email )

385 Charles E. Young Dr. East
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Los Angeles, CA 90095-1476
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