Peer Review in Public Sector Organizations: A General Model and Empirical Evidence from a Survival Analysis

22 Pages Posted: 9 Mar 2017

See all articles by Tim Jaekel

Tim Jaekel

National Research University Higher School of Economics

Date Written: March 9, 2017

Abstract

In my paper I analyze why some top-level public administrators invite a peer review to learn about the strengths and weaknesses of their agencies while others do not. A peer review is a light-touch voluntary benchmarking exercise conducted by a group of critical friends (peers). I propose a general model from which I derive a series of hypotheses about the role of organizational size, performance gaps, peer effects and strategic interaction at individual and organizational-level decision making. For hypotheses tests I examine a unique dataset of participation in the Corporate Peer Challenge Program in England between 2010 and 2015. The estimation approach is survival analysis. I find that poor archival performance of a council and peer evaluations in neighboring councils are positively correlated with inviting a peer review. However, significance level of both effects is above 10 percent.

Keywords: Public Administration, decision making, performance evaluation, peer review, England, corporate peer challenge program, event history analysis, survival analysis

JEL Classification: D72, D73, D81

Suggested Citation

Jaekel, Tim, Peer Review in Public Sector Organizations: A General Model and Empirical Evidence from a Survival Analysis (March 9, 2017). Higher School of Economics Research Paper No. WP BRP 05/PSP/2017, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2930001 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2930001

Tim Jaekel (Contact Author)

National Research University Higher School of Economics ( email )

Myasnitskaya street, 20
Moscow, Moscow 119017
Russia

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