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Tweeting #Justice: Audio-Visual Coverage of Court Proceedings in a World of Shifting Technology

35(1) Cardozo Arts and Entertainment Law Journal 41 (2017)

65 Pages Posted: 22 Mar 2017  

Itay Ravid

Stanford University, School of Law

Date Written: March 9, 2017

Abstract

The debate over whether to allow cameras into courtrooms refuses to fade away. In 2015 alone, U.S. federal courts completed a five-year experiment with cameras in courts, New Zealand published new guidelines for audio-visual coverage, and Scotland completely revised its former broadcast policy. These jurisdictions, and others around the globe, constantly struggle to design model practices that successfully balance freedom of the press, transparency, and public access to information, with rights to a fair trial and privacy. The constant need to rethink coverage policies can be attributed in large part to the advancement of technology, providing the media innovative tools to report from within courtrooms even when formal legal norms bar direct reports. These advancements often result in an unsettling disparity between formal norms and the reality of court coverage.

Drawing on the Israeli example, this Article seeks to address this timely issue, illustrating how social media and technological advancements can push regulators to re-evaluate legal regimes that seem to lag behind the law in action. The Article provides a systematic analysis of both doctrinal arguments and empirical data on the policies adopted by different common law jurisdictions, aiming to devise a policy framework for audio-visual coverage of courts in the age of hyper-technology. By synthesizing lessons from these jurisdictions, the Article first traces the evolution of the doctrine on audio-visual coverage across various jurisdictions, and its constitutional framing. Moreover, the Article exposes the politicization of constitutional law: how courts adopt flexible frameworks with regard to policies on constitutional issues that affect them. Second, the Article suggests that existing empirical data are generally supportive of coverage, showing almost no adverse effects resulting from the presence of cameras in courtrooms. Third, the Article provides practical tools for reaching balanced coverage policies, offering the first analytical framework for the design of coverage policies. The Article utilizes the Israeli case study—a country with currently no audio-visual coverage policy—in order to implement the suggested framework and offers a comprehensive coverage policy within Israeli courts.

Suggested Citation

Ravid, Itay, Tweeting #Justice: Audio-Visual Coverage of Court Proceedings in a World of Shifting Technology (March 9, 2017). 35(1) Cardozo Arts and Entertainment Law Journal 41 (2017). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2930507

Itay Ravid (Contact Author)

Stanford University, School of Law ( email )

Stanford, CA
United States

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