Centralizing Trends and Pollution Law Enforcement in China

China Quarterly, 2017, Forthcoming

UC Irvine School of Law Research Paper No. 2017-17

24 Pages Posted: 22 Mar 2017

See all articles by Benjamin van Rooij

Benjamin van Rooij

University of California, Irvine School of Law

Li Na

University of Amsterdam, Netherlands China Law Centre

Qiaoqiao Zhu

Australian National University (ANU) - College of Business and Economics; Financial Research Network (FIRN)

Wang Qiliang

Yunnan University

Date Written: March 21, 2017

Abstract

This paper analyses centralizing trends that may be able to reduce the negative influence of local protectionism on environmental law enforcement in China. The paper finds that as centralizing trends unfolded enforcement over time has become stricter and more frequent, however with only minor effects of reducing pollution. Moreover it finds a situation of uneven enforcement with richer and more urbanized areas having much stronger and more frequent enforcement than inland areas. Centralizing trends may thus have spurred stronger enforcement, but concurrently allowed for an uneven enforcement. Concurrently the paper finds a continued local influence keeping enforcement too weak to have much effect in reducing pollution, and allowing for local interests to shape enforcement into unequal outcomes.

Keywords: Environment, regulation, decentralization, enforcement

Suggested Citation

van Rooij, Benjamin and Na, Li and Zhu, Qiaoqiao and Qiliang, Wang, Centralizing Trends and Pollution Law Enforcement in China (March 21, 2017). China Quarterly, 2017, Forthcoming; UC Irvine School of Law Research Paper No. 2017-17. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2938787

Benjamin Van Rooij (Contact Author)

University of California, Irvine School of Law ( email )

401 E. Peltason Dr.
Ste. 1000
Irvine, CA 92697-1000
United States

Li Na

University of Amsterdam, Netherlands China Law Centre ( email )

Amsterdam, 1018 WB
Netherlands

Qiaoqiao Zhu

Australian National University (ANU) - College of Business and Economics ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2601
Australia

Financial Research Network (FIRN)

C/- University of Queensland Business School
St Lucia, 4071 Brisbane
Queensland
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://www.firn.org.au

Wang Qiliang

Yunnan University ( email )

Kunming, 650091
China

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