For Whom Does Deterrence Affect Behavior? Identifying Key Individual Differences

28 Pages Posted: 22 Mar 2017

See all articles by Adam Fine

Adam Fine

Arizona State University (ASU) - School of Criminology & Criminal Justice

Benjamin van Rooij

University of California, Irvine School of Law; University of Amsterdam - Faculty of Law

Date Written: March 21, 2017

Abstract

Deterrence threats are essential mechanisms for affecting behavior, yet they are often ineffective. The literature is beginning to consider individual differences underlying differential susceptibility to deterrence. The present study sampled 223 adults from Amazon Mechanical Turk and used an experimental cheating paradigm to examine the role of three individual differences, including morality, self-control, and rule orientation, underlying differential susceptibility to deterrence. The results indicate that deterrence threats may be more influential for people who have low moral disengagement, who possess more self-control, or who are more rule oriented. These findings indicate that important individual differences underlie susceptibility to deterrence.

Suggested Citation

Fine, Adam and van Rooij, Benjamin, For Whom Does Deterrence Affect Behavior? Identifying Key Individual Differences (March 21, 2017). Law and Human Behavior, 2017, Forthcoming, UC Irvine School of Law Research Paper No. 2017-16, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2938794

Adam Fine

Arizona State University (ASU) - School of Criminology & Criminal Justice ( email )

411 N. Central Avenue
Phoenix, AZ 85004
United States

Benjamin Van Rooij (Contact Author)

University of California, Irvine School of Law ( email )

401 E. Peltason Dr.
Ste. 1000
Irvine, CA 92697-1000
United States

University of Amsterdam - Faculty of Law ( email )

Amsterdam, 1018 WB
Netherlands

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