A Positive Theory of the Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine

41 Pages Posted: 30 Mar 2017

See all articles by Ronald J. Allen

Ronald J. Allen

Northwestern University Law School

Mark F. Grady

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - School of Law

Daniel D. Polsby

George Mason University School of Law

Michael Yashko

Independent

Date Written: March 25, 1990

Abstract

This article proposes a positive theory that explains the confidentiality rules. Our argument is that the attorney-client privilege and the work product doctrine offer two perspectives of a larger goal of increasing the amount of information about disputes that is available to courts and to work against the disincentives to the production of that information which would otherwise exist.

Keywords: confidentiality, attorney-client privilege, ethics

JEL Classification: K49

Suggested Citation

Allen, Ronald Jay and Grady, Mark F. and Polsby, Daniel D. and Yashko, Michael, A Positive Theory of the Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine (March 25, 1990). Journal of Legal Studies, Vol. 19, No. 359, 1990. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2940737

Ronald Jay Allen

Northwestern University Law School ( email )

375 E. Chicago Ave
Chicago, IL 60611
United States
312-503-8372 (Phone)
312-503-2035 (Fax)

Mark F. Grady

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - School of Law ( email )

385 Charles E. Young Dr. East
Room 1242
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1476
United States
310-206-1856 (Phone)

Daniel D. Polsby (Contact Author)

George Mason University School of Law ( email )

3301 Fairfax Drive
Arlington, VA 22201
United States

Michael Yashko

Independent

No Address Available

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