Adjusting for Guessing and Applying a Statistical Test to the Disaggregation of Value-Added Learning Scores

Ben O. Smith & Jamie Wagner (2018) Adjusting for guessing and applying a statistical test to the disaggregation of value-added learning scores, The Journal of Economic Education, DOI: 10.1080/00220485.2018.1500959

Posted: 27 Mar 2017 Last revised: 19 Oct 2018

See all articles by Ben Smith

Ben Smith

University of Nebraska at Omaha - Department of Economics

Jamie Wagner

University of Nebraska at Omaha - Department of Economics

Date Written: October 15, 2018

Abstract

In 2016, Walstad and Wagner developed a procedure to split pre- and post-test responses into four learning types: positive, negative, retained, and zero learning. This disaggregation is not only useful in academic studies, it also provides valuable insight to the practitioner: an instructor would take different mitigating actions in response to zero versus negative learning. However, the original disaggregation is sensitive to student guessing. This paper extends the original work by accounting for guessing and provides adjusted estimators using the existing disaggregated values. Further, a statistical test is provided for the adjusted learning type estimates. Using this test, an instructor can determine if a difference in positive (or negative) learning is the result of a true change in learning or 'white noise.'

Keywords: Difference score, learning disaggregation, guessing, simulation

JEL Classification: A20, A22, A23, C63

Suggested Citation

Smith, Ben and Wagner, Jamie, Adjusting for Guessing and Applying a Statistical Test to the Disaggregation of Value-Added Learning Scores (October 15, 2018). Ben O. Smith & Jamie Wagner (2018) Adjusting for guessing and applying a statistical test to the disaggregation of value-added learning scores, The Journal of Economic Education, DOI: 10.1080/00220485.2018.1500959, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2941454 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2941454

Ben Smith (Contact Author)

University of Nebraska at Omaha - Department of Economics ( email )

College of Business Administration
60th and Dodge Streets
Omaha, NE 68182
United States

HOME PAGE: http://bensresearch.com

Jamie Wagner

University of Nebraska at Omaha - Department of Economics ( email )

College of Business Administration
6708 Pine St
Omaha, NE 68182
United States

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