The Anarcho-Calculus of Consent: Proprietary Communities as Substitutes for the State

33 Pages Posted: 6 Apr 2017 Last revised: 30 Jul 2018

See all articles by Michael Makovi

Michael Makovi

Texas Tech University, College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics; Texas Tech University - Free Market Institute

Date Written: September 1, 2017

Abstract

James Buchanan pioneered constitutional political economy, especially in The Calculus of Consent (with Gordon Tullock) and The Limits of Liberty. While he briefly considered private clubs and associations, he mostly limited his analysis to the traditional state. However, privately governed proprietary communities are capable of providing most public goods and internalizing most externalities. We argue that such proprietary communities offer a viable and feasible means for implementing a non-state-based constitutional political economy which satisfies Buchanan's own standards. The state is not necessary to accomplish Buchanan's goals, and Buchanan's works carry unrecognized anarchist implications.

Keywords: Buchanan, Calculus of Consent, Limits of Liberty, proprietary community, private community, homeowners association, condominium, public goods, externality, constitutions

JEL Classification: B31, B53, D62, D71, H10, H41, H70, R00

Suggested Citation

Makovi, Michael, The Anarcho-Calculus of Consent: Proprietary Communities as Substitutes for the State (September 1, 2017). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2944516 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2944516

Michael Makovi (Contact Author)

Texas Tech University, College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics ( email )

Box 42132
Lubbock, TX 79409-2132
United States

Texas Tech University - Free Market Institute ( email )

Box 45059
Lubbock, TX 79409-5059
United States

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