Does Increasing Women's Schooling Raise the Schooling of the Next Generation?

28 Pages Posted: 9 Jan 2002

See all articles by Jere Behrman

Jere Behrman

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Economics

Mark R. Rosenzweig

Yale University - Economic Growth Center; Yale University - Cowles Foundation

Date Written: 2001

Abstract

New data on identical female and male twins are used to estimate the impact of increasing parental schooling on child schooling that incorporates the existence of unmeasured heritable traits and marital sorting. These data yield cross sectional estimates that are consistent with previous studies of the impact of parental schooling on child schooling attainment. However, when twinning is exploited to estimate intergenerational schooling effects, the results are strikingly different. Controlling for women's earnings and childrearing endowments and husband's endowments and schooling leads to a marginally negative rather than a significantly positive coefficient for mother's schooling in the determination of child schooling.

Suggested Citation

Behrman, Jere R. and Rosenzweig, Mark Richard, Does Increasing Women's Schooling Raise the Schooling of the Next Generation? (2001). PIER Working Paper No. 01-051. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=294524 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.294524

Jere R. Behrman (Contact Author)

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Economics ( email )

Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science
133 South 36th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6297
United States
215-898-7704 (Phone)
215-573-2057 (Fax)

Mark Richard Rosenzweig

Yale University - Economic Growth Center ( email )

Box 208269
New Haven, CT 06520-8269
United States
203-432-3620 (Phone)

Yale University - Cowles Foundation

Box 208281
New Haven, CT 06520-8281
United States

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