Welcome to the Neighbourhood: Religion, Law and Living Together

(2016) 75 Supreme Court L. Rev. (2d) 63

D. Newman, ed., Religious Freedom and Communities (Markham: Lexis Nexis, 2016)

12 Pages Posted: 6 Apr 2017  

Shauna Van Praagh

McGill University - Faculty of Law

Date Written: April 4, 2016

Abstract

The realities of a contemporary Montreal neighbourhood with a substantial Chasidic Jewish population reveal ongoing negotiation of community contours and intersecting ways in which respect and room for religious practices and norms, groups and individuals, are generated and sustained. A range of examples of community life, with an emphasis on education, shows that a constitutional guarantee of religious freedom for faith-based institutions or collectives is neither the only, nor the most desirable, form of recognition for religious communities. Any notion of collective religious freedom that attempts to fix the contours and normative structures of a religious institution or community should be subject to serious challenge. Indeed, as the paper illustrates, religious communities can evolve and flourish despite, and even because of, the absence of formal collective rights and freedoms.

Suggested Citation

Van Praagh, Shauna, Welcome to the Neighbourhood: Religion, Law and Living Together (April 4, 2016). D. Newman, ed., Religious Freedom and Communities (Markham: Lexis Nexis, 2016). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2946431 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2946431

Shauna Van Praagh (Contact Author)

McGill University - Faculty of Law ( email )

3644 Peel Street
Montreal H3A 1W9, Quebec
Canada

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