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Emerging Information Technologies: Challenges for Consumers

Oxford University Commonwealth Law Journal (2017) Vol. 17 (2) (published online 17 Aug 2017)

UNSW Law Research Paper No. 25

UNSW Business School Research Paper

40 Pages Posted: 1 May 2017 Last revised: 31 Aug 2017

Kayleen Manwaring

UNSW Australia Business School, School of Taxation and Business Law; UNSW Faculty of Law

Date Written: April 25, 2017

Abstract

A ‘third wave’ of computing is emerging, encompassing technologies that have been called many names, including ubiquitous and pervasive computing, ambient intelligence, the Internet of Things and eObjects. This third wave will bring about significant socio-technical change, especially in the lives of consumers. With this change comes the possibility of a disconnection between consumer protection law and the new things, activities and relationships enabled by the third wave. This article analyses the attributes of these technologies, and identifies where consumers may face challenges relating to acquisition and interaction. These challenges are appraised in the light of the new United Nations consumer protection guidelines, to identify whether likely detrimental outcomes for consumers may conflict with these principles. This paper provides a basis for consumer protection lawyers to examine whether or not their current consumer protection legislation can adequately provide appropriate consumer protection in the face of the third wave.

(This is a pre-peer review version of a paper to be published in the Oxford University Commonwealth Law Journal in 2017.)

Keywords: Internet of Things, Internet law, eObjects, consumer protection, ubiquitous computing, ambient intelligence

JEL Classification: K00

Suggested Citation

Manwaring, Kayleen, Emerging Information Technologies: Challenges for Consumers (April 25, 2017). Oxford University Commonwealth Law Journal (2017) Vol. 17 (2) (published online 17 Aug 2017) ; UNSW Law Research Paper No. 25; UNSW Business School Research Paper. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2958514

Kayleen Manwaring (Contact Author)

UNSW Australia Business School, School of Taxation and Business Law ( email )

Sydney, NSW 2052
Australia

UNSW Faculty of Law ( email )

Sydney
Australia

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