Images and Allusions in Prosecutors’ Morality Tales

Virginia Journal of Criminal Law, Volume 5, Issue 1, Number 38

Emory Legal Studies Research Paper No. 17-433

Wake Forest Univ. Legal Studies Paper

31 Pages Posted: 3 May 2017  

Kay L. Levine

Emory University School of Law

Ronald F. Wright

Wake Forest University - School of Law

Date Written: February 2017

Abstract

In this essay, we catalog and explain four stock images that prosecutors use most often when they describe their own duties and those of their counterparts across the aisle. Prosecutors speak frequently about “wearing the white hat,” “going over to the dark side,” “being a true believer,” and “drinking the Kool-Aid.” These images — and the narratives in which they are embedded — reveal important aspects of the prosecutors’ professional self-image and their relationships with defense attorneys. In so doing, they inspire new ways of thinking about how to engage prosecutors in efforts to reform criminal justice.

Keywords: Criminal Law and Procedure

Suggested Citation

Levine, Kay L. and Wright, Ronald F., Images and Allusions in Prosecutors’ Morality Tales (February 2017). Virginia Journal of Criminal Law, Volume 5, Issue 1, Number 38; Emory Legal Studies Research Paper No. 17-433; Wake Forest Univ. Legal Studies Paper. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2961952

Kay L. Levine (Contact Author)

Emory University School of Law ( email )

1301 Clifton Road
Atlanta, GA 30322
United States

Ronald F. Wright

Wake Forest University - School of Law ( email )

P.O. Box 7206
Winston-Salem, NC 27109
United States
336-758-5727 (Phone)
336-758-4496 (Fax)

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