Closing Small Open Economy Models

17 Pages Posted: 10 Jan 2002

See all articles by Stephanie Schmitt-Grohé

Stephanie Schmitt-Grohé

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Martín Uribe

Columbia University - Graduate School of Arts and Sciences - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Multiple version iconThere are 3 versions of this paper

Date Written: January 2002

Abstract

The small open economy model with incomplete asset markets features a steady state that depends on initial conditions. In addition, equilibrium dynamics posses a random walk component. A number of modifications to the standard model have been proposed to induce stationarity. This Paper presents a quantitative comparison of these alternative approaches. Five different specifications are considered: (1) A model with an endogenous discount factor (Uzawa-type preferences); (2) A model with a debt-elastic interest-rate premium; (3) A model with convex portfolio adjustment costs; (4) A model with complete asset markets; (5) A model without stationarity-inducing features. The main finding of the Paper is that all models deliver virtually identical dynamics at business-cycle frequencies, as measured by unconditional second moments and impulse response functions. The only noticeable difference among the alternative specifications is that the complete-asset-market model induces smoother consumption dynamics.

Keywords: Small open economy, stationarity, complete and incomplete asset markets

JEL Classification: F41

Suggested Citation

Schmitt-Grohe, Stephanie and Uribe, Martin, Closing Small Open Economy Models (January 2002). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=296511

Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe (Contact Author)

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) ( email )

London
United Kingdom

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Martin Uribe

Columbia University - Graduate School of Arts and Sciences - Department of Economics ( email )

420 W. 118th Street
1022 International Affairs Building, MC 3308
New York, NY 10027
United States
212-851-4008 (Phone)
212-854-8059 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
19
Abstract Views
1,586
PlumX Metrics