Protection of Minorities in the Global Gig Economy: Persons with Disabilities As a Case Study

14th Asian Law Institute Conference, Jointly organised by the Asian Law Institute and the University of Philippines, College of Law, 18 & 19 May 2017, Manila

Posted: 22 May 2017

See all articles by Paul Harpur

Paul Harpur

University of Queensland - T.C. Beirne School of Law

Date Written: May 18, 2017

Abstract

Within the gig economy workers are retained for single gigs and not in secure on-going positions. Workers in precarious work are regarded as workers vulnerable to exploitation. Why then does the leading disability human rights convention, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities art 27(1)(f) promote precarious work as a means to enhance the capacity of persons with disabilities to exercise their right to work?

This paper will consider:

(a) How does the ILO and labour law approach precarious work relationships?

(b) Were any reasons provided during the drafting stages of the CRPD as to why the CRPD would promote work relationships which reduce workers’ labour protections as a means to promote equality?

(c) How has self-employment and other precarious work arrangements empowered persons with disabilities? Self-employment increases the capacity of persons with disabilities to structure inclusive work environments.

(d) While precarious work has been associated with positive employment outcomes for persons with disabilities, the risks of reducing the protection afforded by labour and labour laws is often regarded as negating such benefits. What message does it send when the leading disability human.

Suggested Citation

Harpur, Paul David, Protection of Minorities in the Global Gig Economy: Persons with Disabilities As a Case Study (May 18, 2017). 14th Asian Law Institute Conference, Jointly organised by the Asian Law Institute and the University of Philippines, College of Law, 18 & 19 May 2017, Manila. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2971803

Paul David Harpur (Contact Author)

University of Queensland - T.C. Beirne School of Law ( email )

Brisbane, Queensland 4072
Australia

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