Climate Regulation of the Electricity Industry: A Comparative View from Australia, Great Britain, South Korea, and the United States

85 Pages Posted: 24 May 2017 Last revised: 10 Jun 2017

See all articles by Lincoln L. Davies

Lincoln L. Davies

Ohio State University (OSU) - Michael E. Moritz College of Law

Penelope Crossley

The University of Sydney Law School

Peter Connor

University of Exeter

Siwon Park

Kangwon National University - School of Law

Shelby Shaw-Hughes

University of Utah - S.J. Quinney College of Law

Date Written: May 22, 2017

Abstract

Climate regulation of the electricity sector is one of the most important growing — and rapidly changing — areas of law and policy today. This is both because of the critical role that electricity plays in modern society, acting as economic lifeblood, and because of electricity’s part in driving climate change, accounting for more greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions globally than any other activity. This article provides an introduction to different methods of regulating climate emissions from the electricity sector. It does so through detailed, comparative accounts of climate regulation of electricity in four different jurisdictions: Australia, Great Britain, South Korea, and the United States. For each jurisdiction, the article provides a primer on the nation’s electricity sector, its different policy tools for regulating GHG emissions from the sector, and the influence of those regulations in reshaping the provision of electricity in the jurisdiction. A concluding analysis section identifies key lessons learned to date about climate regulation of electricity globally.

Keywords: Climate Change, Global Warming, Greenhouse Gas (GHG), Electricity, Regulation, Renewable Energy, CO2, Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), Emissions Trading Scheme, Feed-In Tariff, Tendering, Auction, Clean Power Plan, Trump, Green Growth, Carbon Tax, Cap and Trade, Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme

JEL Classification: K1, K10, K2, K20, K23, K32, Q2, Q20, Q28, Q29, Q3, Q30, Q38, Q39, Q4, Q40, Q43, Q48, Q49, Q54, N50

Suggested Citation

Davies, Lincoln L. and Crossley, Penelope and Connor, Peter and Park, Siwon and Shaw-Hughes, Shelby, Climate Regulation of the Electricity Industry: A Comparative View from Australia, Great Britain, South Korea, and the United States (May 22, 2017). South Carolina Journal of International Law and Business, Vol. 13, pp. 109-93 , 2017; University of Utah College of Law Research Paper No. 214; Sydney Law School Research Paper No. 17/41. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2972194

Lincoln L. Davies (Contact Author)

Ohio State University (OSU) - Michael E. Moritz College of Law ( email )

55 West 12th Avenue
Columbus, OH 43210
United States

Penelope Crossley

The University of Sydney Law School ( email )

New Law Building, F10
The University of Sydney
Sydney, NSW 2006
Australia

Peter Connor

University of Exeter ( email )

Northcote House
The Queen's Drive
Exeter, Devon EX4 4QJ
United Kingdom

HOME PAGE: http://emps.exeter.ac.uk/renewable-energy/staff/pmc204

Siwon Park

Kangwon National University - School of Law ( email )

1 Kangwondaehak-gil
Gangwon-do, 24341
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Shelby Shaw-Hughes

University of Utah - S.J. Quinney College of Law ( email )

383 S. University Street
Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0730
United States

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