Wal-Mart China: Tian Tian Pingjia

18 Pages Posted: 1 Jun 2017 Last revised: 4 May 2018

See all articles by Gerry Yemen

Gerry Yemen

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business

Wei Li

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Marc Modica

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business

Paul J. Simko

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business

Elliott N. Weiss

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business

Abstract

Having taken stock of where the division was, Scott Price, Wal-Mart China's interim CEO, wanted to lay the groundwork to be able to hand over the reins to the new CEO with an idea of where it was headed. At the end of his assignment, Price would like to leave a report with recommendations that would help position the next leader to be even more successful. What did day-to-day operations look like in 2012? Was there urgency anywhere along the line? Where was Wal-Mart China positioned and where was the market heading?

Excerpt

UVA-OM-1472

Rev. Apr. 19, 2018

Wal-Mart China: Tian Tian Pingjia

From “It's the real thing,” to “We move the world,” to “Low prices. Every day. On everything.” Scott Price had years of experience in Asia—first at Coca-Cola, then DHL, and now as EVP, president, and CEO of Wal-Mart Asia. In October 2011, when the former China Wal-Mart CEO decided to leave, Price stepped up to serve as interim CEO.

Fully understanding transition management, Price wanted to get the China operations ready for a new leader. Holding the fort meant more than coasting along. Price had several issues to keep tabs on: the Trust-Mart conversions to Wal-Mart systems and merchandise, the logistics of opening more stores in Tier II and III cities, and the fallout from the pork product mislabeling that shut down some stores for 15 days in Chongqing.

Having taken stock of where the division was, Price wanted to lay the groundwork to be able to hand over the reins to the new CEO with an idea of where it was headed. At the end of his assignment, Price would like to leave a report with recommendations that would help position the next leader to be even more successful. What did day-to-day operations look like in 2012? Was there urgency anywhere along the line? Where was Wal-Mart China positioned and where was the market heading?

. . .

Keywords: supplier, supply chain, china, walmart, distribution, retail

Suggested Citation

Yemen, Gerry and Li, Wei and Modica, Marc and Simko, Paul and Weiss, Elliott N., Wal-Mart China: Tian Tian Pingjia. Darden Case No. UVA-OM-1472. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2974984

Gerry Yemen

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business ( email )

P.O. Box 6550
Charlottesville, VA 22906-6550
United States

Wei Li

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business ( email )

P.O. Box 6550
Charlottesville, VA 22906-6550
United States
804-243-7691 (Phone)
804-243-7681 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.darden.virginia.edu/faculty/li.htm

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

Marc Modica

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business ( email )

P.O. Box 6550
Charlottesville, VA 22906-6550
United States

Paul Simko

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business ( email )

P.O. Box 6550
Charlottesville, VA 22906-6550
United States
434-924-1391 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.darden.virginia.edu/faculty/simko.htm

Elliott N. Weiss (Contact Author)

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business ( email )

P.O. Box 6550
Charlottesville, VA 22906-6550
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.darden.virginia.edu/html/direc_detail.aspx?styleid=2&id=4375

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