The Theory of Multiple Intelligences

Davis, K., Christodoulou, J., Seider, S., & Gardner, H. (2011). The theory of multiple intelligences. In R.J. Sternberg & S.B. Kaufman (Eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Intelligence (pp. 485-503). Cambridge, UK; New York: Cambridge University Press.

19 Pages Posted: 9 Jun 2017

See all articles by Katie Davis

Katie Davis

University of Washington - The Information School

Joanna Christodoulou

Independent

Scott Seider

Independent

Howard Earl Gardner

Independent

Date Written: 2011

Abstract

The theory of multiple intelligences, developed by psychologist Howard Gardner in the late 1970s and early 1980s, posits that individuals possess eight or more relatively autonomous intelligences. Individuals draw on these intelligences, individually and corporately, to create products and solve problems that are relevant to the societies in which they live (Gardner, 1983, 1993, 1999, 2006b, 2006c). The eight identified intelligences include linguistic intelligence, logical-mathematical intelligence, spatial intelligence, musical intelligence, bodily-kinesthetic intelligence, naturalistic intelligence, interpersonal intelligence, and intrapersonal intelligence (Gardner, 1999). According to Gardner’s analysis, only two intelligences – linguistic and logical mathematical – have been valued and tested for in modern secular schools; it is useful to think of that language-logic combination as “academic” or “scholarly intelligence.” In conceiving of intelligence as multiple rather than unitary in nature, the theory of multiple intelligences – hereafter MI theory – represents a departure from traditional conceptions of intelligence first formulated in the early 20th century, measured today by IQ tests, and studied in great detail by Piaget (1950, 1952) and other cognitively oriented psychologists.

Keywords: multiple intelligences

Suggested Citation

Davis, Katie and Christodoulou, Joanna and Seider, Scott and Gardner, Howard Earl, The Theory of Multiple Intelligences (2011). Davis, K., Christodoulou, J., Seider, S., & Gardner, H. (2011). The theory of multiple intelligences. In R.J. Sternberg & S.B. Kaufman (Eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Intelligence (pp. 485-503). Cambridge, UK; New York: Cambridge University Press., Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2982593

Katie Davis (Contact Author)

University of Washington - The Information School ( email )

Box 353350
Seattle, WA 98195
United States
206-221-7741 (Phone)
206-616-3152 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://katiedavisresearch.com/

Joanna Christodoulou

Independent

Scott Seider

Independent

Howard Earl Gardner

Independent ( email )

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