Jewish Persecutions and Weather Shocks: 1100–1800

35 Pages Posted: 12 Jun 2017

See all articles by Warren Anderson

Warren Anderson

University of Michigan at Dearborn

Mark Koyama

George Mason University - Department of Economics; George Mason University - Mercatus Center

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: June 2017

Abstract

What factors caused the persecution of minorities in pre‐modern Europe? Using panel data consisting of 1,366 persecutions of Jews from 936 European cities between 1100 and 1800, we test whether persecutions were more likely following colder growing seasons. A one standard deviation decrease in growing season temperature in the previous five‐year period increased the probability of a persecution by between 1 and 1.5 percentage points (relative to a baseline of 2%). This effect was strongest in weak states and with poor quality soil. The long‐run decline in persecutions was partly attributable to greater market integration and state capacity.

Suggested Citation

Anderson, R. Warren and Koyama, Mark, Jewish Persecutions and Weather Shocks: 1100–1800 (June 2017). The Economic Journal, Vol. 127, Issue 602, pp. 924-958, 2017. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2984364 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ecoj.12331

R. Warren Anderson (Contact Author)

University of Michigan at Dearborn ( email )

4901 Evergreen Road
Dearborn, MI 48128-1491
United States

Mark Koyama

George Mason University - Department of Economics ( email )

4400 University Drive
Fairfax, VA 22030
United States

HOME PAGE: http://mason.gmu.edu/~mkoyama2/About.html

George Mason University - Mercatus Center ( email )

3434 Washington Blvd., 4th Floor
Arlington, VA 22201
United States

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