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A Private Ordering Defense of a Company's Right to Use Dual Class Share Structures in IPOs

26 Pages Posted: 15 Jun 2017 Last revised: 17 Sep 2017

Bernard S. Sharfman

R Street Institute

Date Written: September 14, 2017

Abstract

The shareholder empowerment movement (movement) has renewed its effort to eliminate, restrict or at the very least discourage the use of dual class share structures in initial public offerings (IPOs). This renewed effort was triggered by the recent Snap Inc. IPO that utilized non-voting stock. Such advocacy, if successful, would not be trivial, as many of our most valuable and dynamic companies, including Alphabet (Google) and Facebook, have gone public by offering shares with unequal voting rights.

Unless there are significant sunset provisions, a dual class share structure allows insiders to maintain voting control over a company even when, over time, there is both an ebbing of superior leadership skills and a significant decline in the insiders’ ownership of the company’s common stock. Yet, investors are willing to take that risk even to the point of investing in dual class shares where the shares have no voting rights and barely any sunset provisions, such as in the recent Snap Inc. IPO. Why they are willing to do so is a result of the wealth maximizing efficiency that results from the private ordering of corporate governance arrangements and the understanding that agency costs are not the only costs of governance that need to be minimized.

In this essay, Zohar Goshen and Richard Squire’s newly proposed “principal-cost theory,” “each firm’s optimal governance structure minimizes the sum of principal costs, produced when investors exercise control, and agent costs, produced when managers exercise control,” is used to argue that the use of dual class shares in IPOs is a value enhancing result of private ordering, making the movement’s renewed advocacy unwarranted.

Keywords: corporate governance, corporate law, dual class shares, IPOs, initial public offering, controlling shareolders, shareholder empowerment, principal-cost theory

JEL Classification: K2, K20, K22

Suggested Citation

Sharfman, Bernard S., A Private Ordering Defense of a Company's Right to Use Dual Class Share Structures in IPOs (September 14, 2017). Villanova Law Review, Vol. 63, No. 1, 2018. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2986164

Bernard S. Sharfman (Contact Author)

R Street Institute ( email )

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#1150
Washington, DC 20036
United States
(202) 525-5717 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.rstreet.org/

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