Political Association and the Anti-Terrorism Bill

Posted: 9 Mar 2002

See all articles by David Schneiderman

David Schneiderman

University of Toronto - Faculty of Law

Brenda Cossman

University of Toronto - Faculty of Law

Abstract

In the aftermath of September 11th, Canadians appear to be more willing to give up their civil liberties in exchange for enhanced feelings of security. This paper examines the impact of Bill C-36 on rights and freedoms, focusing on the politics of associational life. The authors contend that the definition of "terrorist activity" is overbroad, potentially capturing individuals and groups engaged in a broad range of political activities, both lawful and unlawful. Peaceful anti-globalization protestors or illegal striking workers could fall within the definition of "terrorist activity" and the related offences of participating, facilitating or financing terrorism. In a society where pluralistic associational life is expected to flourish, and where public spaces for political expression are shrinking, the anti-terrorism bill poses a significant threat to political association and protest in Canada.

Suggested Citation

Schneiderman, David and Cossman, Brenda, Political Association and the Anti-Terrorism Bill. THE SECURITY OF FREEDOM: ESSAYS ON CANADA'S ANTI-TERRORISM BILL, Ronald J. Daniels, Patrick Macklem and Kent Roach, eds., U of Toronto Press, 2001. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=298752

David Schneiderman (Contact Author)

University of Toronto - Faculty of Law ( email )

78 Queen's Park
Toronto, Ontario M5S 2C5
Canada
416-978-2677 (Phone)
416-978-7899 (Fax)

Brenda Cossman

University of Toronto - Faculty of Law ( email )

78 and 84 Queen's Park
Toronto, Ontario M5S 2C5
Canada
416-978-6658 (Phone)

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