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The Effect of Government Contracting on Academic Research: An Empirical Analysis of Reputation in Research Procurement

43 Pages Posted: 10 Feb 2002  

Brent D. Goldfarb

University of Maryland - Robert H. Smith School of Business

Date Written: November 2006

Abstract

The growing share of university research funded by industry has sparked concerns that academics will sacrifice traditional scholarly activities to pursue commercial goals. To investigate this concern, I examine the influence of an applied sponsor and consider limitations of the grant funding mechanism. A novel dataset tracks the careers of academic engineers and their relationships with this sponsor. I find that a) researchers who maintain a relationship with the directed sponsor experience a decrease in publications
implying that academics' careers may be a function of the type of funding received, not only talent, b) academic merit does not necessarily serve as a funding criterion for sponsors, and c) citation and publication measures of academic output are often not useful proxies for short-term commercial or social value.

Keywords: Reputation, R&D, Science Productivity, Science Funding, University-Industry Interface, Science Productivity measures

JEL Classification: L2, L3, H5, J4, O3

Suggested Citation

Goldfarb, Brent D., The Effect of Government Contracting on Academic Research: An Empirical Analysis of Reputation in Research Procurement (November 2006). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=299396 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.299396

Brent D. Goldfarb (Contact Author)

University of Maryland - Robert H. Smith School of Business ( email )

College Park, MD 20742-1815
United States
301-405-9672 (Phone)
301-314-8787 (Fax)

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