The Decline of the Hydropower Czar and the Rise of Agency Pluralism in Hydroelectric Licensing

50 Pages Posted: 19 Jul 2017

See all articles by Michael C. Blumm

Michael C. Blumm

Lewis & Clark Law School

Vikki Nadol

Lewis & Clark College

Date Written: October 14, 2001

Abstract

This article explains the numerous environmental protections contained in an unlikely statute, the Federal Power Act, first enacted in 1920. Federally licensed hydropower projects are often the largest influences on streamflows in watersheds, so making the projects environmentally compatible is no small achievement. This article examines the history of federal hydroelectric licensing, its environmental effects, and several important judicial interpretations of the provisions of the Federal Power Act calling for protection of federal public land reserves and the provision of "fishways" at licensed projects as well as water quality standards compliance under the Clean Water Act. None of these substantive protections were changed by the procedural complexities imposed in the 2005 Energy Policy Act of 2005.

Keywords: hydropower, fish and wildlife, water quality, federalism, water law

JEL Classification: H23, H77, H82, K11, K23, K32, N52, O13, O44, P28, Q15, Q22, Q25, Q28, Q42, Q48, Q58

Suggested Citation

Blumm, Michael C. and Nadol, Vikki, The Decline of the Hydropower Czar and the Rise of Agency Pluralism in Hydroelectric Licensing (October 14, 2001). Columbia Journal of Environmental Law Vol. 26, No. 81 (2001). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3002184

Michael C. Blumm (Contact Author)

Lewis & Clark Law School ( email )

10015 S.W. Terwilliger Blvd.
Portland, OR 97219
United States
503-768-6824 (Phone)
503-768-6701 (Fax)

Vikki Nadol

Lewis & Clark College ( email )

0615 SW Palatine Hill Road
Portland, OR 97204
United States

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