White Boys Drink, Black Girls Yell...: A Racialized and Gendered Analysis of Violent Hazing and the Law

18 J. GENDER, RACE, & JUST. 97(2013)

66 Pages Posted: 20 Jul 2017

See all articles by Gregory Scott Parks

Gregory Scott Parks

Wake Forest University - School of Law

Shayne Jones

University of South Florida

Rashawn Ray

University of Maryland

Matthew W. Hughey

University of Connecticut, Department of Sociology

Jonathan Cox

University of Central Florida - College of Sciences, Department of Sociology

Date Written: 2013

Abstract

In the past several decades, legal scholars have directed a modest amount of time and energy toward the issue of hazing. However, only within the past couple of years has there been any concerted effort to investigate the intersection of African American fraternities and sororities — also known as Black Greek-Letter Organizations (“BGLOs”) — and the law, particularly including hazing issues. The recent emergence of this scholarship is in striking contrast to the long and storied history of these organizations. Despite their longevity and accomplishments, information about BGLOs has largely been confined to their own internal texts. It was not until the mid-1990s that scholars generally began to investigate these organizations. It took almost another decade for public works on these groups to appear. Shortly thereafter, a proliferation of BGLO scholarship appeared. In this article, the authors theorize that legally consequential behavior is influenced by race and sex. Specifically, this article contends that hazing, as a form of legally consequential behavior, manifests itself quite differently within BGLOs than within their white counterpart organizations. Specifically, this article finds that hazing in Black fraternities is more physically violent. The authors contend that prevailing and yet provincial notions of Black masculinity in the United States underscore the violent nature of Black fraternity hazing.

Section I provides an anthropological history of rites of passage, as well as the evolution of collegiate fraternity and sorority hazing. Next, Section II analyzes the legal implications of hazing in both the criminal and civil realms. Section III reviews the study of hazing in White fraternities and sororities, as well as Black fraternities and sororities. The article concludes in Section IV with an empirical analysis, via an archival study and a large national survey, of how race and gender intersect to predict different forms of hazing among fraternity and sorority members, and why race and gender intersect to create a unique variant of hazing within Black fraternities.

Keywords: Black Greek-Letter Organizations, BGLOs, hazing

Suggested Citation

Parks, Gregory Scott and Jones, Shayne and Ray, Rashawn and Hughey, Matthew W. and Cox, Jonathan, White Boys Drink, Black Girls Yell...: A Racialized and Gendered Analysis of Violent Hazing and the Law (2013). 18 J. GENDER, RACE, & JUST. 97(2013). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3004714 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3004714

Gregory Scott Parks (Contact Author)

Wake Forest University - School of Law ( email )

P.O. Box 7206
Winston-Salem, NC 27109
United States
3367582170 (Phone)

Shayne Jones

University of South Florida ( email )

Tampa, FL 33620
United States

Rashawn Ray

University of Maryland ( email )

College Park
College Park, MD 20742
United States

Matthew W. Hughey

University of Connecticut, Department of Sociology ( email )

Unit 2068
344 Mansfield Road
Storrs, CT 06269-2-68
United States
860.486.4422 (Phone)
860.486.6356 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.matthewhughey.com

Jonathan Cox

University of Central Florida - College of Sciences, Department of Sociology ( email )

FL 32816-1400
United States

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