Killing in the Slums: Social Order, Criminal Governance, and Police Violence in Rio de Janeiro

46 Pages Posted: 31 Jul 2017 Last revised: 20 Nov 2018

See all articles by Beatriz Magaloni

Beatriz Magaloni

Stanford University - Department of Political Science

Edgar Franco Vivanco

Stanford University

Vanessa Melo

Stanford University - Center for Latin American Studies

Date Written: November 19, 2018

Abstract

State interventions against drug trafficking organizations (DTOs) sometimes work to improve security, but often exacerbate violence. To understand why, this paper offers a theory about different social order dynamics among five types of criminal regimes – Insurgent, Bandit, Symbiotic, Predatory, and Anarchic. These differ according to whether criminal groups confront or collude with state actors; predate or cooperate with the community; and hold a monopoly or contest territory with rival DTOs. Police interventions in these criminal orders pose different challenges and are associated with markedly different local security outcomes. Evidence for the theory is provided by the use a multi-method research design combining quasi-experimental statistical analyses, extensive qualitative research and a large N survey in the context of Rio de Janeiro’s “Pacifying Police Units” (UPPs), which sought to reclaim control of the slums from organized criminal groups

Keywords: Criminal violence, Criminal governance, Policing, Brazil, Latin America

Suggested Citation

Magaloni, Beatriz and Franco Vivanco, Edgar and Melo, Vanessa, Killing in the Slums: Social Order, Criminal Governance, and Police Violence in Rio de Janeiro (November 19, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3010013 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3010013

Beatriz Magaloni

Stanford University - Department of Political Science ( email )

Stanford, CA 94305
United States
650-724-7481 (Phone)

Edgar Franco Vivanco (Contact Author)

Stanford University ( email )

Stanford, CA 94305
United States

Vanessa Melo

Stanford University - Center for Latin American Studies

Bolivar House 582 Alvarado Row
Stanford, CA 94305
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
73
rank
304,125
Abstract Views
324
PlumX Metrics