Collective Identity, Memories of Violence, and Belief in a Biased International Criminal Court: Evidence from Kenya

44 Pages Posted: 8 Aug 2017

See all articles by Yvonne Dutton

Yvonne Dutton

Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Geoff Dancy

Tulane University

Eamon Aloyo

Leiden University

Tessa Alleblas

Independent

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: August 7, 2017

Abstract

International judicial institutions consistently struggle to build diffuse support. This struggle is particularly visible at the International Criminal Court (ICC), which aims to hold leaders accountable for grave atrocity crimes. In situation countries, the push for accountability invites an 'us vs. them' narrative, which frames the ICC as an outsider court set on intruding in sovereign affairs. When the ICC charged political operatives with organizing bloody post-election violence in 2007-8, Kenyan leaders publicly advanced a conspiratorial narrative that the Court is a neocolonial institution biased against Africa. This article uses unique survey data collected throughout Kenya to seek answers to the following question: which citizens are most likely to believe this story that the ICC is politically biased? The psychological approach we advance predicts that people negotiate between collective identities and personal experience when evaluating narratives about the performance of international institutions in their country. Ruling-party supporters, who are also ethnically similar, are far more likely to agree that the ICC is biased against Africans. However, those with a personal experience of post-election violence are much less likely agree that the ICC is biased against Africa, even if they are members of the ethnic groups represented in the ruling coalition. Among other things, this implies that the ICC is more supported by those who have borne the brunt of political violence.

Suggested Citation

Dutton, Yvonne and Dancy, Geoff and Aloyo, Eamon and Alleblas, Tessa, Collective Identity, Memories of Violence, and Belief in a Biased International Criminal Court: Evidence from Kenya (August 7, 2017). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3015011 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3015011

Yvonne Dutton (Contact Author)

Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law ( email )

530 West New York Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202
United States

Geoff Dancy

Tulane University ( email )

United States

Eamon Aloyo

Leiden University ( email )

Postbus 9500
Leiden, 2300 RA
Netherlands

Tessa Alleblas

Independent ( email )

No Address Available

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