Wage Premia and Skill Upgrading in Italy: Why Didn't the Hound Bark?

38 Pages Posted: 28 Feb 2002

See all articles by Paolo Manasse

Paolo Manasse

Università degli Studi di Bologna - Department of Economics; IGIER, Bocconi University; International Monetary Fund (IMF) - Fiscal Affairs Department

Luca Stanca

University of Milan, Bicocca - Department of Economics; Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca - Center for Interdisciplinary Studies in Economics, Psychology & Social Sciences (CISEPS); Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca - Department of Economics, Management and Statistics (DEMS)

Alessandro Turrini

European Commission; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: February 2002

Abstract

This Paper presents firm level evidence on the dynamics of non-manual wage premia and employment shares in Italian manufacturing during the nineties. We find that the relative stability of aggregate wage premia and employment shares hides offsetting disaggregate forces. First, while technical progress raises the relative demand for skilled labor within firms, demand changes associated with exports reduce the relative demand for skills. Second, within the class of non-manual workers, wage premia and employment shares of executives rise substantially, whereas those of clerks fall in a similar proportion. We also find that the export status of firms plays a key role in explaining labor market dynamics, as exporters account for most of both demand-related and technology-related shifts. Overall, our results for Italy question the general validity of the conventional view that emphasizes the role of labor market institutions, as opposed to trade and technology, in determining wage and employment dynamics in continental Europe.

Keywords: Wage differentials, technological change, international trade

JEL Classification: F12, F16, J31

Suggested Citation

Manasse, Paolo and Stanca, Luca and Turrini, Alessandro, Wage Premia and Skill Upgrading in Italy: Why Didn't the Hound Bark? (February 2002). CEPR Discussion Paper No. 3202. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=302385

Paolo Manasse (Contact Author)

Università degli Studi di Bologna - Department of Economics ( email )

Via Strada Maggiore, 45
I-40125 Bologna
Italy
+39 05 1209 2613 (Phone)

IGIER, Bocconi University

Via Sarfatti 25
20136 Milan, MI 20136
Italy
+39 02 5836 3326 (Phone)

International Monetary Fund (IMF) - Fiscal Affairs Department ( email )

700 19th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20431
United States

Luca Stanca

University of Milan, Bicocca - Department of Economics ( email )

Piazza dell'Ateneo, Nuovo I
Milan 20126
Italy

Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca - Center for Interdisciplinary Studies in Economics, Psychology & Social Sciences (CISEPS) ( email )

Piazza dell'Ateneo Nuovo, 1
Milano, 20126
Italy

Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca - Department of Economics, Management and Statistics (DEMS) ( email )

Piazza dell'Ateneo Nuovo, 1
Milan, 20126
Italy

Alessandro Turrini

European Commission ( email )

Office BU-10/113
B-1049 Brussels
Belgium
+32 2 299 5072 (Phone)
+32 2 299 3505 (Fax)

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

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