Executive Business Doctorate: A Journey of Motivations, Expectancies, Cost and Realized Value

73 Pages Posted: 29 Aug 2017 Last revised: 2 Sep 2017

See all articles by Ginger Lange

Ginger Lange

Georgia State University, J. Mack Robinson College of Business

Kamau Smith

Georgia State University, J. Mack Robinson College of Business

Katherine Spradley

Georgia State University, J. Mack Robinson College of Business

Wesley James Johnston

Georgia State University - J. Mack Robinson College of Business

Date Written: September 8, 2017

Abstract

There is a significant rise in executive doctoral programs offered by business schools. In offering the executive doctorate, the school administrators opportunistically seek to address an underserved population. This population is comprised of experienced professionals characterized by their collective desire to educate themselves beyond the master’s degree level in business, but for whom the traditional, full-time Ph.D. program path does not meet their needs. Although executive doctoral programs seem well-positioned to serve the needs of this population, this relatively new option has yet to prove sustainable value. Thus, the choice to pursue the executive doctorate is risky for prospective students, especially given the significant investments of money, time, and effort. This case study examined the motivations, expectancies, experiences, and outcomes from the perspective of executive doctoral program graduates through the application of modern expectancy-value theory. The researchers conducted in-depth interviews with 33 graduates from five AACSB-accredited executive doctoral programs. The researchers analyzed responses to 37 questions using qualitative and quantitative analysis methods. The results provided rich understanding into the decision process and factors impacting the obtainment of the doctoral degree and realizing value through associated outcomes. This empirical study contributes theoretically by applying all four value components of expectancy-value theory in the graduate business school setting. The research contributes to practice by providing valuable insights to prospective students and doctoral program administrators.

Keywords: doctorate, expectancy-value theory, motivation, executive education, case study

Suggested Citation

Lange, Ginger and Smith, Kamau and Spradley, Katherine and Johnston, Wesley James, Executive Business Doctorate: A Journey of Motivations, Expectancies, Cost and Realized Value (September 8, 2017). Seventh International Engaged Management Scholarship Conference. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3027107 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3027107

Ginger Lange

Georgia State University, J. Mack Robinson College of Business ( email )

PO Box 4050
Atlanta, GA
United States

Kamau Smith

Georgia State University, J. Mack Robinson College of Business ( email )

PO Box 4050
Atlanta, GA
United States

Katherine Spradley (Contact Author)

Georgia State University, J. Mack Robinson College of Business ( email )

PO Box 4050
Atlanta, GA
United States

Wesley James Johnston

Georgia State University - J. Mack Robinson College of Business ( email )

P.O. Box 4050
Atlanta, GA 30303-3083
United States

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
58
Abstract Views
246
rank
375,627
PlumX Metrics