Indirect Discrimination and the Duty to Avoid Compounding Injustice

Foundations of Indirect Discrimination Law, Hart Publishing Company, 2018, Forthcoming

Virginia Public Law and Legal Theory Research Paper No. 2017-53

17 Pages Posted: 8 Sep 2017 Last revised: 31 Oct 2017

Deborah Hellman

University of Virginia - School of Law

Date Written: September 1, 2017

Abstract

This chapter resurrects, conceptualizes and defends an old account of why disparate impact discrimination sometimes wrongs its victims. In Local 189, United Papermakers v. United States, a Fifth Circuit case from 1969, the court prohibited the use of a seniority system that effectively kept African-Americans from better paying jobs within the company on the grounds that “[w]hen an employer adopts a system that necessarily carries forward the incidents of discrimination into the present, his practice constitutes on-going discrimination, unless the incidents are limited to those that safety and efficiency require.” Drawing on that insight, I argue that sometimes laws, policies and practices that produce a disparate impact on a protected group compound prior injustice and are, for that reason, wrong.

I begin by arguing for a general duty to avoid compounding injustice. Next, I turn to disparate impact discrimination and suggest that some paradigm cases involve the wrong of compounding injustice. Finally, I explore whether this account provides a reason to describe the wrong at issue as a form of discrimination.

Suggested Citation

Hellman, Deborah, Indirect Discrimination and the Duty to Avoid Compounding Injustice (September 1, 2017). Foundations of Indirect Discrimination Law, Hart Publishing Company, 2018, Forthcoming; Virginia Public Law and Legal Theory Research Paper No. 2017-53. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3033864

Deborah Hellman (Contact Author)

University of Virginia - School of Law ( email )

580 Massie Road
Charlottesville, VA 22903
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
128
rank
208,821
Abstract Views
562
PlumX