Structural Transformation, Deep Downturns, and Government Policy

15 Pages Posted: 11 Sep 2017

See all articles by Joseph E. Stiglitz

Joseph E. Stiglitz

Columbia Business School - Finance and Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: September 2017

Abstract

Most recessions are a result of some shock to the economic system, typically amplified by financial accelerators, and leading to large balance sheet effects of households and firms, which result in the effects persisting. But, over time, the balance sheets get restored. Even banks recover. But episodically, the “shock” is deeper. It is structural. Among advanced countries, the movement from agricultural to manufacturing in the last century, and the more recent movement from manufacturing to the service sector reflect such a large economic transformation. The associated downturns are longer lasting. The usual responses, in particular, monetary policy, are only of limited efficacy. Policies have to be designed to facilitate such transformations: markets on their own typically do not do well.This paper explains why such transformations are associated with persistently high unemployment, and describes the effects of particular government policies. It looks at the lessons of the Great Depression both for the advanced countries and the developing countries as they go through their structural transformations.

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Suggested Citation

Stiglitz, Joseph E., Structural Transformation, Deep Downturns, and Government Policy (September 2017). NBER Working Paper No. w23794. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3035142

Joseph E. Stiglitz (Contact Author)

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