Exploring the Racial Gap in Infant Mortality Rates, 1920-1970

57 Pages Posted: 8 Mar 2002 Last revised: 26 Oct 2010

See all articles by William J. Collins

William J. Collins

Vanderbilt University - College of Arts and Science - Department of Economics; The Brookings Institution; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Melissa A. Thomasson

Miami University of Ohio - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: March 2002

Abstract

This paper examines the racial gap in infant mortality rates from 1920 to 1970. Using state-level panel data with information on income, urbanization, women's education, and physicians per capita, we can account for a large portion of the racial gap in infant mortality rates between 1920 and 1945, but a smaller portion thereafter. We re-examine the post-war period in light of trends in birth weight, smoking, air pollution, breast-feeding, insurance, and hospital births.

Suggested Citation

Collins, William J. and Thomasson, Melissa A., Exploring the Racial Gap in Infant Mortality Rates, 1920-1970 (March 2002). NBER Working Paper No. w8836. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=303558

William J. Collins (Contact Author)

Vanderbilt University - College of Arts and Science - Department of Economics ( email )

Box 1819 Station B
Nashville, TN 37235
United States
615-322-3428 (Phone)

The Brookings Institution

1775 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20036-2188
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Melissa A. Thomasson

Miami University of Ohio - Department of Economics ( email )

208 Laws Hall
Oxford, OH 45056
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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