Review: Aquaculture Law and Policy: Global, Regional and National Perspectives, edited by Nigel Bankes, Irene Dahl and David L Vangerzwaag

Water Law, Vol. 25, pp. 255-256

2 Pages Posted: 29 Sep 2017

See all articles by Stephen Minas

Stephen Minas

Peking University - Peking University School of Transnational Law

Date Written: May 21, 2017

Abstract

Today’s global marine environment is confronted by the challenges of intensifying and often competing uses of the seas. In addition to competition to exploit recently discovered, and perhaps newly accessible, non-living resources, novel applications of technology such as marine renewable energy are further expanding the human footprint on the oceans. With the growing use of the oceans comes pollution and biodiversity depletion. In addition, research indicates that the oceans are suffering major detrimental effects as a result of climate change. While international law provides a well-elaborated legal framework for human activities at sea, it is clear that the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) – and other instruments of ocean governance – are being stress-tested as never before.

Keywords: UNCLOS, aquaculture, technology transfer, biodiversity, China, EU

JEL Classification: K32

Suggested Citation

Minas, Stephen, Review: Aquaculture Law and Policy: Global, Regional and National Perspectives, edited by Nigel Bankes, Irene Dahl and David L Vangerzwaag (May 21, 2017). Water Law, Vol. 25, pp. 255-256. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3040584

Stephen Minas (Contact Author)

Peking University - Peking University School of Transnational Law ( email )

Shenzhen
China

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