Workers' Compensation Fiscal Structure and Economic Growth - a West Virginia Issue?

Posted: 15 Mar 2002

See all articles by Richard Hatcher

Richard Hatcher

Marshall University - Lewis College of Business

Michael J. Hicks

Marshall University - Lewis College of Business

Kristy L. Wilburn

Marshall University - Lewis College of Business

Abstract

Richard Hatcher, Michael J. Hicks, and Kristy L. Wilburn ask whether West Virginia's workers' compensation system retards the state's economic growth and conclude that it does not.

The authors found that during 19 of the 21 years included in a study, West Virginia employers expended a lower percentage of payroll on workers' compensation than comparable employers did on average in 47 other jurisdictions.

Changes in workers' compensation benefits paid may have a statistically significant impact on economic development in just over half the states. However, the impact is so small that it is economically insignificant, the authors say.

Suggested Citation

Hatcher, Richard and Hicks, Michael J. and Wilburn, Kristy L., Workers' Compensation Fiscal Structure and Economic Growth - a West Virginia Issue?. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=304140

Richard Hatcher (Contact Author)

Marshall University - Lewis College of Business ( email )

400 Hal Greer Boulevard
Center for Business and Economic Research
Huntington, WV 25755
United States
304-696-3331 (Phone)

Michael J. Hicks

Marshall University - Lewis College of Business ( email )

400 Hal Greer Boulevard
Center for Business and Economic Research
Huntington, WV 25755
United States
304-696-6251 (Phone)

Kristy L. Wilburn

Marshall University - Lewis College of Business ( email )

400 Hal Greer Boulevard
Center for Business and Economic Research
Huntington, WV 25755
United States
304-696-4814 (Phone)

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