Central Banks: Evolution and Innovation in Historical Perspective

87 Pages Posted: 25 Sep 2017

See all articles by Michael D. Bordo

Michael D. Bordo

Rutgers University, New Brunswick - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Pierre L. Siklos

Wilfrid Laurier University - School of Business & Economics; Balsillie school of international affairs

Date Written: September 2017

Abstract

Central banks have evolved for close to four centuries. This paper argues that for two centuries central banks caught up to the strategies followed by the leading central banks of the era; the Bank of England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and the Federal Reserve in the twentieth century. It also argues that, by the late 20th century, small open economies were more prone to adopt a new policy regime when the old one no longer served its purpose whereas large, less open, and systemically important economies were more reluctant to embrace new approaches to monetary policy. Our study blends the quantitative with narrative explanations of the evolution of central banks. We begin by providing an overview of the evolution of monetary policy regimes taking note of the changing role of financial stability over time. We then provide some background to an analysis that aims, via econometric means, to quantify the similarities and idiosyncrasies of the ten central banks and the extent to which they represent a network of sorts where, in effect, some central banks learn from others.

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Suggested Citation

Bordo, Michael D. and Siklos, Pierre L., Central Banks: Evolution and Innovation in Historical Perspective (September 2017). NBER Working Paper No. w23847. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3042408

Michael D. Bordo (Contact Author)

Rutgers University, New Brunswick - Department of Economics ( email )

New Brunswick, NJ
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Pierre L. Siklos

Wilfrid Laurier University - School of Business & Economics ( email )

Department of Economics
75 University Avenue W.
Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5
Canada
519-884-0710 Ext.. 3491 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://pierrelsiklos.com

Balsillie school of international affairs ( email )

67 Erb Street West
Waterloo, ON N2L 6C2
Canada

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